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Articles tagged “Art exhibition

Photo by Isabella Ow
Photo by Isabella Ow

5Stars: Understanding National Values Through Art

Posted on June 5, 2016

It is a tribute to Singapore’s 50th anniversary in 2015 and its national values of Peace, Justice, Equality, Democracy, and Progress.

Five of Singapore’s eminent artists Ho Tzu Nyen, Matthew Ngui, T.K Sabapathy, Suzann Victor and Zulkifle Mahmod were invited and commissioned to create large-scale works inspired by these themes. The artworks, spread across SAM’s exhibition spaces, offer a view into how these humanist values could be envisioned for the future. The exhibit provides a sacred space of sorts, one that opens the floor for deep reflection and discourse to flourish from appreciation.

The author had the privilege of experiencing the multi-platform installations of this exhibit, as well as the chance to pick the brains of participating artists Ho Tzu Nyen and Matthew Ngui, and co-head curator for Of Equal Measure and Bloodline of Peace, Joyce Toh.

Photo by Mimic Productions Berlin

Photo by Mimic Productions Berlin

Value: Justice
Artist: Ho Tzu Nyen
Title: No Man (2015)
Materials: Six-channel audio-video installation

As a national value, the notion of justice need not veer away from how it would be defined in the judicial court of law. In the video installation, entitled No Man, justice is presented in an otherworldly and cross-worldly dimension, and applying haunting overtones to the theme. Artist Tzu Nyen has acknowledged taking Meditation XVII: Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, a 17th-century poem by John Donne, as a jump-off point for his artwork. The metaphysical poem ruminates on the consequences of man’s actions, in accountability to a greater God and as a deep reflection on the meaning of humanity.

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The Everyday Revolution

Posted on February 7, 2016

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Sophia Tan, SINGAPORE

Founder, Managing Director of The Everyday Revolution

A framed canvas sits in the middle of a room.

Swirls of red, blue, green form a kaleidoscopic flurry; their streaks and splatters made in watercolour beg to tell a story. At first glance, the story is whimsical and jovial, as bright colours often seem to have that effect. Yet, as it goes in the world of art, one must plunge beyond the colourful surface and swim with the undertow to reach the depths of its true meaning.

Is this all too esoteric? We stand in the middle of a museum or a gallery; across a piece of artwork on display waiting to be dissected, judged, loved, understood. Whether it is a portrait made with oil or water, or a figure sculpted by hand, it simply sits there, like a puzzle to be decoded, the worth of its maker’s story waiting to be measured. Yet somehow, we manage—to grasp, to resonate, to connect. And its maker—the artist—succeeds. Beyond the price pegged for its value—or the fame and adulation that may follow—nothing could be more gratifying than the connection made with another being amidst all the layers of our expression.


Imagine the world of a person with autism, a condition defined as a developmental disability that affects how a person communicates with, and relates to, other people, as well as how they make sense of the world around them. Fortunately, more progressive and passionate advocates are emerging and enabling opportunities for people with special needs to be heard, understood, and provided a chance to participate in society.

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